Remember this Land is Your Land

There had been several attempts to dismantle National Monuments by big oil for years. But alas, someone put pen to paper.

http://www.rawstory.com/2017/05/trumps-plan-to-dismantle-national-monuments-comes-with-steep-cultural-and-ecological-costs/amp/

History – Twisted by Nature

First, a simple thought. History by Nature means is has already happened. Today and this hour has little impact on History. History is tainted by the people who retell the facts or believed truths. So when someone jumps up to define the problems of History, please understand it is not your place. When you have lived in someone else’s circumstances and know their time period well enough to respect the people who went through it, your eyes might see why things have changed.

Back in 1924, several small towns set up a collection. The idea started about 1890 when the Southern states started losing their Civil War veterans. Although Robert E Lee opposed any statues being raised to him or his Generals, the Southern public wanted to memorialize them. Much like the one in Charlottesville, Va. This was something paid for by the orginal “Go Fund Me” practice of socials by average almost middle class families. Keep in mind every family lost someone and saw more come back wounded. “Remember the boys who wore the grey”

The statue did not carry any Confederate States of America insignias. The soldiers who the statue memorialize, died and were probably left in empty fields. Both sides saw 620,000 soldiers lost their lives and another million were injured beyond the ability to return to the War and their regular lives. The Southern states had no Army or Navy on April 12, 1861. Their fields that supplied their industry and food were almost exclusively the battlefields of the Civil War.

The Monuments to the common “Johnny Reb” are not monuments of hate but remembrance. It is unfair to celebrate its destruction as a political statement. No government or party of hate created this chunk of bronze. While today “enlightened” protesters are correct in that slavery is wrong, maybe they should remember indentured servitude and corporate towns were normal perils of lower classes that impacted just as many people.

Facts are terrible ways to argue a point here. But the slaves in Maryland, Kentucky, Delaware and DC were not freed by President Lincoln. He didn’t free any slaves unless they were “recovered” in the States that rebelled and territory controlled by the US Army. Condemning the statue of a simple soldier fighting for their way of life (shocker here must Southerns didn’t own slaves). The Ninth Amendment gave powers that were not specifically designated to the Federal Government to the States themselves. In 1807, Massachusetts argued the Louisiana purchase would cause small states to lose its representation to these new larger territories. Secession was an old idea in 1861 but far from illegal. The primary factor in secession was economic. The South had tariffs placed on their raw materials ( mostly cotton, sorgham & hemp) by a predominately Northern Controlled Congress that wanted to sell finished goods to the world. Southern cotton seen to England made New England factories less money. These factories also were the ones with Company stores and their own currency. The Civil War was also due in part to Lincoln would never meet with any representatives of the CSA, because it would legitimize the country in European views.

So remind me of why we tear down a soldiers statue in the name of preserving our modern way of life. Violence by any group is still rooting at best and terrorism if done to stand any message.

But just my thoughts.

Decoration Day

image

Officially it’s Memorial Day in the US. But it was once Decoration Day.  The origins of this run deep.  The Union troops first celebrated the holiday on May 30, 1868.  But their were ones before that.

April 26,1866 was the first offical celebration of the Civil War dead in the south.  The gravesodd the Confederate troops were decorated with ribbons and buttons.  It was a symbol of homespun touches.  The south want left with much. Most of the people in the south eye fast from rich before the war.

There small marking on Anniversary of major battles were common for both Northern and Southern graves.  This was a war that no one thought would ever come.  It’s a war that started with only a Northern Army and  Northern Navy.   The South were farmers with little industry.   Every able bodied man who wasn’t a plantain owner fought in the South.

The Northern Armies were full of troops that well to do people paid others to take their place.  In the North, a grand horse race track called Saratoga opened in the height of the war.  The Southern people raced to Richmond to riot for bread.  The honor of the fighters for the South was not lost that all but Gettysburg was fought in their homes, their fields, over their crops.

Both sides died in a war to force the country back together. From the beginning when families watch on the side lines outside Alexandria.  To the surrender at Appomattox Courthouse.  These men lead to a celebration to honor all those lost in battle under Stars and Stripes

Shoo-fly Ruins – Exploring My World 

A first blush these aren’t the ruins you go to visit.   Actually this is what find look like before they are cleaned up and repaired and signed.  The rock outlines and fences spread out across 4 acres here.   There are changes in styles of rooms and positioning with other rooms.  Over four hundred years people lived here.   They used rocks as foundations and covered them with branches or skins and wooden frames.  

In the picture above, the sapling pine sits where a door was.  There is an oval ring where a house stood about 1150 AD toward the end of their stay here. 

It’s on the Houston Mesa Rd off of North Arizona 87.  There’s a weird feeling to the place.  You could spend more time here than you realize. 

Reblog – Gaspard de Besse: Robin Hood of Provence

The Curious Rambler

Gaspard de Besse, Robin Hood of Provence

Just like Robin Hood, Gaspard de Besse robbed from the rich (who detested him) and gave to the poor (who adored him). But while Robin Hood’s roots are shrouded in mystery, there’s no doubt about the identity of our French outlaw.

Young Gaspard
Gaspard Bouis, later known as Gaspard de Besse, was born February 9, 1757 in Besse-sur-Issole, a small village in the Var region of southern France. His father died one year later, and Gaspard was placed in the care of the local priest. The priest assumed Gaspard would follow his footsteps into a religious life and made sure he had a proper education.

However, Gaspard was a charming, handsome smooth-talker who wasn’t suited to the priestly way of life. At the age of seventeen, he left the small town of Besse and went to Toulon for a taste of the city. It’s in Toulon that he began his…

View original post 874 more words

Profound

​The embodiment of profound

Obfuscation of the message

Panacea to common sense

You unite in dividing

Noble scarecrows bow

Highness of sorts, never reached

Your dias commands quite a view

Reality may never see it that way

Their loss and suffering of ignorance 

If you could impart your ways again

We are dying to hear the cure of our ills 

Only one can dance us to the edge

Into yonder Valley lies paradise

Or is it our grave.

<a href="https://dailypost.wordpress.com/prompts/249091/">Profound</a>

Buffalo Hunt

You’ll find full guidelines on the TLT page – here’s the tl;dr:

  • Write three lines inspired by the photo prompt (& give them a title if possible).
  • Link back to this post.
  • Tag your post with 3LineTales (so everyone can find you in the Reader).
  • Read and comment on other TLT participants’ lines.
  • If you want your post to be included in the round-up, you have until Sunday evening to publish it.
  • Have fun.

Happy three-lining!

https://only100words.xyz/2016/07/28/three-line-tales-week-twenty-six/

The sun warmed the prairies surrounding the Greasy Grassy River, the bison entered the valley looking for fresh grazing opportunities.  A single scout came down from the ridge hurriedly toward the battle chiefs tipi. 

“Tonight, we light up our tents to show our white brothers we are far too many to attack during game the hunt.”  Crazy Horse smiles knowing Custer is a dead man.

#TLT

#3linetales