Arizona SonoraDesert Museum – Exploring My World

Outside of Tucson is a place to see critters and plants of the desert up close.  Much like the little kitty above, you can see what lives here.  The place is spread out over 98 acres.  It’s in a very hot place in the summer (I visited at 105 degrees).  It’s a full day to see it all. 

They have an aquarium, a reptile & amphibians building, an art gallery, a cave with mineral gallery, two aviaries (one for hummingbirds), a dozen animal enclosures (like above Mountain Lion), cactus gardens, stingray touch pool, and 2 gift shops.  Several hourly docent displays are spread out during the day.  These include snake touching.  Life cycles of the Saguaro cactus.  Life in the rivers and streams in Arizona. And they change daily. Well versed people are waiting to explain how the desert works.

The landscape has been planted 55 years ago to represent as much of the Sonora desert that would predate human interference.  While not all of these would grow here, they all live in the Sonora desert that covers from the Baja peninsula to New Mexico.  Butterfly gardens include non native plants but the butterflies are wild feeding here.  

The animals are here by assignment.  The Mountain Lion was orphaned.  The pair of Mexican grey wolves are a retired breeding pair that was used to restore native range. The Black bear was raised by humans. They live in nice sized enclosures with AC and shade.  The 19 stingrays enjoy a covered pool and for $3 you can touch them ($3 more you can feed them shrimp).

Meteor Crater- Exploring My World


What happens when a 150 foot wide chunk of Iron and nickel drops in on the Earth? You get a hole a mile wide and 500 feet deep! Welcome to Barringer Crater, aka Meteor Crater.  The crater is located 40 miles East of Flagstaff, AZ.  Its right off of Interstate 40. 

This is the windest place North of Antarctica! There is a steady 30 mph wind and it gusts well above that. But its the easiest to visit and best preserved crater around.  Most craters are eroded by water, in Northern Arizona not much of a problem.

There are three observation areas set up along the rim. Two are slightly below the rim. There is no access within or to the bottom. You get a fairly young (50,000 year old) feature that all the hallmarks an impact crater.  This is what the Moon surface is coveted with.  The astronauts actually trained here before going to the Moon.

There’s a movie telling the story. There are guided tours subject to weather.  The have a small display of other impact craters, meteor types, and video simulaions. You can put your hands on a 1400 pound piece of the meteor responsible for this whole thing.  

If you are in the Flagstaff area, its worth a stop even at $18/adult. This is a good add on to Sunset Crater or Wapitaki trips